Diagnosis

If your family doctor or pediatrician suspects your child has cerebral palsy, he or she will evaluate your child’s signs and symptoms, review your child’s medical history, and conduct a physical evaluation. Your doctor may refer you to a specialist trained in treating children with brain and nervous system conditions (pediatric neurologist).

Your doctor will also order a series of tests to make a diagnosis and rule out other possible causes.

Brain scans

Brain-imaging technologies can reveal areas of damage or abnormal development in the brain. These tests may include the following:

  • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An MRI uses radio waves and a magnetic field to produce detailed 3-D or cross-sectional images of your child’s brain. An MRI can often identify any lesions or abnormalities in your child’s brain.

    This test is painless, but it’s noisy and can take up to an hour to complete. Your child will likely receive a mild sedative beforehand. An MRI is usually the preferred imaging test.

  • Cranial ultrasound. This can be performed during infancy. A cranial ultrasound uses high-frequency sound waves to obtain images of the brain. An ultrasound doesn’t produce a detailed image, but it may be used because it’s quick and inexpensive, and it can provide a valuable preliminary assessment of the brain.

Electroencephalogram (EEG)

If your child has had seizures, your doctor may order an electroencephalogram (EEG) to determine if he or she has epilepsy, which often occurs in people with cerebral palsy. In an EEG test, a series of electrodes are affixed to your child’s scalp.

The EEG records the electrical activity of your child’s brain. If he or she has epilepsy, it’s common for there to be changes in normal brain wave patterns.

Laboratory tests

Laboratory tests may also screen for genetic or metabolic problems.

Additional tests

If your child is diagnosed with cerebral palsy, you’ll likely be referred to specialists for assessments of other conditions often associated with the disorder. These tests may identify:

  • Vision impairment
  • Hearing impairment
  • Speech delays or impairments
  • Intellectual disabilities
  • Other developmental delays
  • Movement disorders

Treatment

Children and adults with cerebral palsy require long-term care with a medical care team. This team may include:

  • Pediatrician or physiatrist. A pediatrician oversees the treatment plan and medical care.
  • Pediatric neurologist. A doctor trained to diagnose and treat children with brain and nervous system (neurological) disorders may be involved in your child’s care.
  • Orthopedic surgeon. A doctor trained to treat muscle and bone disorders may be involved to diagnose and treat muscle conditions.
  • Physical therapist. A physical therapist may help your child improve strength and walking skills, and stretch muscles.
  • Occupational therapist. An occupational therapist can provide therapy to your child to develop daily skills and to learn to use adaptive products that help with daily activities.
  • Speech-language pathologist. A doctor trained to diagnose and treat speech and language disorders may work with your child if your child suffers from speech, swallowing or language difficulties.
  • Developmental therapist. A developmental therapist may provide therapy to help your child develop age-appropriate behaviors, social skills and interpersonal skills.
  • Mental health specialist. A mental health specialist, such as a psychologist or psychiatrist, may be involved in your child’s care. He or she may help you and your child learn to cope with your child’s disability.
  • Recreation therapist. Participation in art and cultural programs, sports, and other events that help children expand physical and cognitive skills and abilities. Parents of children often note improvements in a child’s speech, self-esteem and emotional well-being.
  • Social worker. A social worker may assist your family to find services and plan for care transitions.
  • Special education teacher. A special education teacher addresses learning disabilities, determines educational needs and identifies appropriate educational resources.

Medications

Medications that can lessen the tightness of muscles may be used to improve functional abilities, treat pain and manage complications related to spasticity or other cerebral palsy symptoms.

It’s important to talk about drug treatment risks with your doctor and discuss whether medical treatment is appropriate for your child’s needs. Medication selection depends on whether the problem affects only certain muscles (isolated) or the whole body (generalized). Drug treatments may include the following:

  • Isolated spasticity. When spasticity is isolated to one muscle group, your doctor may recommend onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox) injections directly into the muscle, nerve or both. Botox injections may help to improve drooling. Your child will need injections about every three months.

    Side effects may include pain, mild flu-like symptoms, bruising or severe weakness. Other more-serious side effects include difficulty breathing and swallowing.

  • Generalized spasticity. If the whole body is affected, oral muscle relaxants may relax stiff, contracted muscles. These drugs include diazepam (Valium), dantrolene (Dantrium) and baclofen (Gablofen).

    Diazepam carries some dependency risk, so it’s not recommended for long-term use. Its side effects include drowsiness, weakness and drooling.

    Dantrolene side effects include sleepiness, weakness, nausea and diarrhea.

    Baclofen side effects include sleepiness, confusion and nausea. Note that baclofen may also be pumped directly into the spinal cord with a tube. The pump is surgically implanted under the skin of the abdomen.

Your child also may be prescribed medications to reduce drooling. Medications such as trihexyphenidyl, scopolamine or glycopyrrolate (Robinul, Robinul Forte) may be helpful, as can Botox injection into the salivary glands.

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