Sure, you can watch celebrities like Alan Alda and Michael J. Fox talk about life with Parkinson’s disease. You can read medical articles and understand the definition of Parkinson’s, which is a neurodegenerative disorder that targets the neurons in the part of the brain that produce dopamine. This results in motor symptoms like tremor, rigid limbs, balance and gait problems and slowness of movement; and non-motor symptoms like sleep disorders and depression. But there are some things a textbook or doctor can’t tell you — like what it’s really like to live day in and day out with Parkinson’s.

When it comes to those details, only someone else who has Parkinson’s can give you that insider knowledge. If you’re newly diagnosed, they can tell you what to prepare for, and if you’ve been living with Parkinson’s for a while, they can tell you that you’re actually not the only one experiencing that “weird” symptom. So we asked our Mighty Parkinson’s community to share something people don’t tend to understand about Parkinson’s unless they have it themselves. Check out the “secrets” they shared below. Did we miss anything? Be sure to leave a comment and explain what you would add to our list.

1. It can be frustrating not being able to do small things.

The tremors, bradykinesia (slowness of movement) and rigidity caused by Parkinson’s can make doing things requiring fine motor skills difficult. For example, you might have trouble buttoning a shirt or cutting a sandwich.

Ellie Finch Hulme, blogger at PD Mama, explained:

How frustrating it is not being able to do the smallest of things, despite willing your brain to send the right message and have the right limb, for example, receive that message and act upon it. Things as simple as moving fingers to type. Things that we take for granted in our everyday lives.

2. Tremors are not always visible — they can be internal, too.

“People who do not have Parkinson’s do not understand what internal tremors are,” Sharon Krischer, blogger at Twitchy Woman, said.

Most people are aware that external tremors are a hallmark sign of Parkinson’s, but what many people don’t know is that tremors can also be internal. This feels like a shaking sensation inside the body.

3. Women with Parkinson’s disease may present with different symptoms and challenges than men.

For women, hormones can impact Parkinson’s and vice versa — you might notice worsening Parkinson’s symptoms, heavier menstrual flow, more fatigue and less effectiveness of medications while you have your period. Some research has also suggested that during the “preclinical” phase of Parkinson’s, or period of time before a doctor’s diagnosis, women’s non-motor symptoms may be more prominent than their motor symptoms, meaning they may get diagnosed later than men do.

Maria De Leon, blogger at Parkinson’s Diva, shared:

Unless you are a young woman with PD, you don’t realize the impact that having hormone fluctuations play on the symptoms of the disease, while PD itself [can] worsen the menstrual cycle and other hormonal related medical problems like migraines. [Also], how young women with PD take longer to get a diagnosis because of the prevalent non-motor symptoms at presentation compared to their male counterparts.

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